Okay, what is the deal with this album? Why does everyone hate it? Am I the only one who appreciates the rockin' riff of "Let It All Hang Out", the cool beat and lyrics of "Trippin' Down The Freeway", the awesome buildup and heart-filled lyrics of "Put Me Back Together", the great tune of "The Girl Got Hot", and the classic "I Want You To"? Why all the hate? Please give me specific reasons, not "this album is a piece of s***". Please explain. Thanks, and I don't care if you guys hate it, just wondering why.

 

For the few who like this album, what is your favorite song? Mine is "Put Me Back Together"

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Raditude is shallow, but it is better than Hurley.  And DTFM.  I like it, but it doesn't hold its own to previous albums.
I agree with you for the most part, especially the part where we do have to draw the line with lyrics that are too immature. Although I do like Raditude and am a HUGE fan of Maladroit; I just want to ask, If it's not about thinking that the 90's Weezer is the one true Weezer, then why do refer to everything from Green-Hurley as "post-Pinkerton"? It all is still Weezer music. I'm not attacking your opinion on the album. The Blue album and Pinkerton are timeless albums, not a lot of musci in general can stack up to those albums, but neither will any new Weezer albums if we look at them in Blue and Pinkerton's shadow.
  johnny rockets said:

Like Gohi said, we're not haters. Personally, I was really looking forward to Raditude when it was announced. I had very high hopes that Rivers could hone his pop-rock writing craft with individuals who have a history of producing Top 40 hits.

 

This isn't about thinking 90's Weezer is the one "true" Weezer. The band (and Rivers) take many shapes and forms. Each album is unique in its style and approach. That is something I've always appreciated about this band.

 

The fact of the matter is Raditude is a complete disappointment on all fronts. I love watching bands evolve and change over time, because I am too. However, when my favorite band is writing songs that show a regression in their abilities, I can't sit still. If Rivers wants to be a hit machine, that's fine as long as the songs are good.

 

But Raditude was a terrible direction. For a man who we all know can develop melodies that rival Paul McCartney and Brian Wilson and write lyrics that are both clever and thoughtful, for a band we know are collectively and individually (see The Space Twins, The Relationship, Special Goodness) musically capable of producing classic tracks, Raditude is beyond underwhelming.

 

I don't want this band to create another Blue or Pinkerton. In fact Make Believe, Red, and Hurley (despite the missteps because they are there) all show that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Rivers doesn't have to be depressed to write good songs. The last thing I want is for the man to be a reclusive hermit again. I want him to actually write about his daughter without mutating it into a song about picking up younger chicks or socks. I want him to write genuine songs showing his affection for his wife for once.

 

Of course he doesn't have to be limited to just those topics. But when Rivers writes from the point of view of a 14 year old (even if I do kinda enjoy that stupid daydreaming about ice cream song) or leopard handbags or chicklets, I've gotta draw a line somewhere.  Rivers always had a way of being immature in his lyrics, but at least they were witty back then.

 

There's also the issue with the lack of solos and variety in song arrangements. Something like Blowin' My Stack isn't the most poetic thing, but it's fun and interesting as hell. That breakdown and that scream is something that has been missing in Weezer for a long time.

 

But hey does any of this ruined the experience of being a Weezer fan? No. I'm still here, on 2 different Weezer message boards no less. I've been a fan for 13 years and I don't plan on stopping. This isn't about being one type of fan or another. This is about critiquing Weezer's output and pointing on what I enjoy and find brilliant, and what i find terribly embarrassing and facepalm worthy.

 

All I want from this band is to produce an album with great songs from tracks 1 through 10 again and for them, as well as the fans, to be happy with the final product.


Michael Rowland (Gohi) said:

Guys, this is a discussion forum. Don't get bent out of shape about other people's honest thoughts or opinions. Also, I hope you don't lump my or johnny rockets' post in with the "haters" just because we don't like the album, because we were both respectful and constructive.

I don't necessarily view everything in contrast with Blue or Pinkerton, it's just for reference sake, a point in time when Rivers' song writing and Weezer as a band changed. Some people may connect the term "post-pinkerton" with negative connotations, but for me just because something is released in the 2000's doesn't necessarily make it automatically worse than something released in the 90's. But yes that era does cast a shadow, and that's because Weezer has failed to produce an entire album at the level of their earlier material.

 

I want to mention though that tracks like Pig, Angel, Sweeney, Perfect Situation, Blowin' My Stack, Hold Me, The Other Way, Burndt Jamb, Mad Kow, This Is Such A Pity, Unspoken, Run Away, Hang On,  Photograph, O Girlfriend, Don't Let Go (2005), Private Message, The Organ Player, So Low, Island in the Sun, Smile, and Time Flies are all songs I hold in very high regard, and some I like much more than a few 90's tracks.

 

Still, to me, Rivers/Weezer produced better music in the 90's. That includes all b-sides, unreleased demos, and RCB/Homie material. It's not something I've fooled myself into believing due to nostalgia and adolescent attachment. It's something that I base on when I listen to the words and musical arrangements, to the key changes, to the way Rivers's sings, to the way Pat hits his drum kit, to the solos, breakdowns, background vocals, bass, guitar, everything. 

 

Some might argue, in regards to songs from s2k-DTFM, "well why don't you just enjoy it for what it is?" Trust me I do, I can sing along to every Weezer album. But then I'll go from listening to Let It All Hang Out, singing about vitamin water and everything, until Angel comes on and reality sinks in: Weezer is better than Raditude, than the majority of what they've released in the past decade.

 

I'm waiting for the next great Weezer album. Hell, I've been waiting since I first became a fan in 98, since the comeback, since the term "post-pinkerton" was created. So when Raditude came out, following all the promise that the Red era showed, I felt slighted like "what the f*** is this mess?" And then to add insult to injury, Prettiest Girl is regulated to the deluxe edition, a mere afterthought despite Karl hailing it as the best post-pinkerton and Pat revealing some love for it as well.

 

Still, no matter how large the shadow of Weezer's earlier material casts, it won't deter me from thinking anything new is just as brilliant or inspiring. That is as long as this band is wiling to try collectively to produce something that is brilliant and inspiring and leaves the talk of malls and hot high school reunion girls behind.

Scott Alan Perkins said:

I agree with you for the most part, especially the part where we do have to draw the line with lyrics that are too immature. Although I do like Raditude and am a HUGE fan of Maladroit; I just want to ask, If it's not about thinking that the 90's Weezer is the one true Weezer, then why do refer to everything from Green-Hurley as "post-Pinkerton"? It all is still Weezer music. I'm not attacking your opinion on the album. The Blue album and Pinkerton are timeless albums, not a lot of musci in general can stack up to those albums, but neither will any new Weezer albums if we look at them in Blue and Pinkerton's shadow.
  johnny rockets said:

Like Gohi said, we're not haters. Personally, I was really looking forward to Raditude when it was announced. I had very high hopes that Rivers could hone his pop-rock writing craft with individuals who have a history of producing Top 40 hits.

 

This isn't about thinking 90's Weezer is the one "true" Weezer. The band (and Rivers) take many shapes and forms. Each album is unique in its style and approach. That is something I've always appreciated about this band.

 

The fact of the matter is Raditude is a complete disappointment on all fronts. I love watching bands evolve and change over time, because I am too. However, when my favorite band is writing songs that show a regression in their abilities, I can't sit still. If Rivers wants to be a hit machine, that's fine as long as the songs are good.

 

But Raditude was a terrible direction. For a man who we all know can develop melodies that rival Paul McCartney and Brian Wilson and write lyrics that are both clever and thoughtful, for a band we know are collectively and individually (see The Space Twins, The Relationship, Special Goodness) musically capable of producing classic tracks, Raditude is beyond underwhelming.

 

I don't want this band to create another Blue or Pinkerton. In fact Make Believe, Red, and Hurley (despite the missteps because they are there) all show that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Rivers doesn't have to be depressed to write good songs. The last thing I want is for the man to be a reclusive hermit again. I want him to actually write about his daughter without mutating it into a song about picking up younger chicks or socks. I want him to write genuine songs showing his affection for his wife for once.

 

Of course he doesn't have to be limited to just those topics. But when Rivers writes from the point of view of a 14 year old (even if I do kinda enjoy that stupid daydreaming about ice cream song) or leopard handbags or chicklets, I've gotta draw a line somewhere.  Rivers always had a way of being immature in his lyrics, but at least they were witty back then.

 

There's also the issue with the lack of solos and variety in song arrangements. Something like Blowin' My Stack isn't the most poetic thing, but it's fun and interesting as hell. That breakdown and that scream is something that has been missing in Weezer for a long time.

 

But hey does any of this ruined the experience of being a Weezer fan? No. I'm still here, on 2 different Weezer message boards no less. I've been a fan for 13 years and I don't plan on stopping. This isn't about being one type of fan or another. This is about critiquing Weezer's output and pointing on what I enjoy and find brilliant, and what i find terribly embarrassing and facepalm worthy.

 

All I want from this band is to produce an album with great songs from tracks 1 through 10 again and for them, as well as the fans, to be happy with the final product.


Michael Rowland (Gohi) said:

Guys, this is a discussion forum. Don't get bent out of shape about other people's honest thoughts or opinions. Also, I hope you don't lump my or johnny rockets' post in with the "haters" just because we don't like the album, because we were both respectful and constructive.
I was just curious. Everytime I read "post-pinkerton" it makes me think of post apocalypse. This whole thread has proven that even the worst Weezer album still has great songs, and it's the worst Weezer album, but still doesn't make it a bad album altogether.

johnny rockets said:

I don't necessarily view everything in contrast with Blue or Pinkerton, it's just for reference sake, a point in time when Rivers' song writing and Weezer as a band changed. Some people may connect the term "post-pinkerton" with negative connotations, but for me just because something is released in the 2000's doesn't necessarily make it automatically worse than something released in the 90's. But yes that era does cast a shadow, and that's because Weezer has failed to produce an entire album at the level of their earlier material.

 

I want to mention though that tracks like Pig, Angel, Sweeney, Perfect Situation, Blowin' My Stack, Hold Me, The Other Way, Burndt Jamb, Mad Kow, This Is Such A Pity, Unspoken, Run Away, Hang On,  Photograph, O Girlfriend, Don't Let Go (2005), Private Message, The Organ Player, So Low, Island in the Sun, Smile, and Time Flies are all songs I hold in very high regard, and some I like much more than a few 90's tracks.

 

Still, to me, Rivers/Weezer produced better music in the 90's. That includes all b-sides, unreleased demos, and RCB/Homie material. It's not something I've fooled myself into believing due to nostalgia and adolescent attachment. It's something that I base on when I listen to the words and musical arrangements, to the key changes, to the way Rivers's sings, to the way Pat hits his drum kit, to the solos, breakdowns, background vocals, bass, guitar, everything. 

 

Some might argue, in regards to songs from s2k-DTFM, "well why don't you just enjoy it for what it is?" Trust me I do, I can sing along to every Weezer album. But then I'll go from listening to Let It All Hang Out, singing about vitamin water and everything, until Angel comes on and reality sinks in: Weezer is better than Raditude, than the majority of what they've released in the past decade.

 

I'm waiting for the next great Weezer album. Hell, I've been waiting since I first became a fan in 98, since the comeback, since the term "post-pinkerton" was created. So when Raditude came out, following all the promise that the Red era showed, I felt slighted like "what the f*** is this mess?" And then to add insult to injury, Prettiest Girl is regulated to the deluxe edition, a mere afterthought despite Karl hailing it as the best post-pinkerton and Pat revealing some love for it as well.

 

Still, no matter how large the shadow of Weezer's earlier material casts, it won't deter me from thinking anything new is just as brilliant or inspiring. That is as long as this band is wiling to try collectively to produce something that is brilliant and inspiring and leaves the talk of malls and hot high school reunion girls behind.

Scott Alan Perkins said:

I agree with you for the most part, especially the part where we do have to draw the line with lyrics that are too immature. Although I do like Raditude and am a HUGE fan of Maladroit; I just want to ask, If it's not about thinking that the 90's Weezer is the one true Weezer, then why do refer to everything from Green-Hurley as "post-Pinkerton"? It all is still Weezer music. I'm not attacking your opinion on the album. The Blue album and Pinkerton are timeless albums, not a lot of musci in general can stack up to those albums, but neither will any new Weezer albums if we look at them in Blue and Pinkerton's shadow.
  johnny rockets said:

Like Gohi said, we're not haters. Personally, I was really looking forward to Raditude when it was announced. I had very high hopes that Rivers could hone his pop-rock writing craft with individuals who have a history of producing Top 40 hits.

 

This isn't about thinking 90's Weezer is the one "true" Weezer. The band (and Rivers) take many shapes and forms. Each album is unique in its style and approach. That is something I've always appreciated about this band.

 

The fact of the matter is Raditude is a complete disappointment on all fronts. I love watching bands evolve and change over time, because I am too. However, when my favorite band is writing songs that show a regression in their abilities, I can't sit still. If Rivers wants to be a hit machine, that's fine as long as the songs are good.

 

But Raditude was a terrible direction. For a man who we all know can develop melodies that rival Paul McCartney and Brian Wilson and write lyrics that are both clever and thoughtful, for a band we know are collectively and individually (see The Space Twins, The Relationship, Special Goodness) musically capable of producing classic tracks, Raditude is beyond underwhelming.

 

I don't want this band to create another Blue or Pinkerton. In fact Make Believe, Red, and Hurley (despite the missteps because they are there) all show that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Rivers doesn't have to be depressed to write good songs. The last thing I want is for the man to be a reclusive hermit again. I want him to actually write about his daughter without mutating it into a song about picking up younger chicks or socks. I want him to write genuine songs showing his affection for his wife for once.

 

Of course he doesn't have to be limited to just those topics. But when Rivers writes from the point of view of a 14 year old (even if I do kinda enjoy that stupid daydreaming about ice cream song) or leopard handbags or chicklets, I've gotta draw a line somewhere.  Rivers always had a way of being immature in his lyrics, but at least they were witty back then.

 

There's also the issue with the lack of solos and variety in song arrangements. Something like Blowin' My Stack isn't the most poetic thing, but it's fun and interesting as hell. That breakdown and that scream is something that has been missing in Weezer for a long time.

 

But hey does any of this ruined the experience of being a Weezer fan? No. I'm still here, on 2 different Weezer message boards no less. I've been a fan for 13 years and I don't plan on stopping. This isn't about being one type of fan or another. This is about critiquing Weezer's output and pointing on what I enjoy and find brilliant, and what i find terribly embarrassing and facepalm worthy.

 

All I want from this band is to produce an album with great songs from tracks 1 through 10 again and for them, as well as the fans, to be happy with the final product.


Michael Rowland (Gohi) said:

Guys, this is a discussion forum. Don't get bent out of shape about other people's honest thoughts or opinions. Also, I hope you don't lump my or johnny rockets' post in with the "haters" just because we don't like the album, because we were both respectful and constructive.
I only really like (If You're Wondering if I Want You To) I Want You To, but The Girl Got Hot is good too. As a whole, this album is okay. It isn't nearly as bad as people say it is, though.
Thanks, this is a very well put answer!


James Stockwell (Jamekae) said:

The first five points that come into my mind on why Raditude sucks:

 

1) The whole album feels like a knee-jerk reaction by Rivers after awareness of growing irrelevancy. Raditude feels like Rivers' answer to try to avoid musical redundancy. ("If I work with songwriters who have written huge hits for Katy Perry, The Veronicas, Britney Spears, Madonna, Bowling for Soup [etc.] I will be as popular as they are!")

2) Most of the lyrics are vapid and show obvious detachment from the author, in some cases Rivers wasn't even the author (J.D. wrote the lyrics for Can't Stop Partying) and do you think Rivers really felt what he sang in Put Me Back Together? He's a forty year old man that should be singing about themes that aren't f*cking taking your girl out to ice-cream (he should be singing stuff like The Angel and the One + Pig), yet you guys still think it's the most sincere stuff out. It 100% sounds like an All American Rejects song, not a Weezer song (I guess it helps that the All American Rejects co-wrote the song!).

3) Bland, uninspired, predictable song directions. There ain't any Paperface/Hot Tub-esque, left field bridges here folks!

4) "Hi, my name is Rivers Cuomo, my favourite band is Weezer and my favourite album is Raditude" + Wuggies + Sydney + the name "Raditude". Don't need to elaborate on this.

5) Horrible mixed + overproduced. Where was the Weezer that fought for good mixing for the Red album?

 

The Prettiest Girl in the Whole Wide World, Run Over By a Truck, I Don't Want to Let You Go and Trippin' Down the Freeway are the sole standouts of the album for me. Incidentally, they are the only tracks not to have co-write credits and all of them were written before The Red Album dropped, proving just how bad 2009 was for Weezer.

Yeah, but for me its more they mix "heavy metal" guitar licks with Weezer singing. Pretty cool imo, but I respect yours.

johnny rockets said:

To me, Maladroit is their worst album. It doesn't even necessarily feel like a real album, just a collection of songs they threw on the wall and saw what stuck. I was there during that era, both on .com and the RCB, downloading every demo, providing my input. If the band had chosen better songs (We Go Together, So Low, Faith In The Light, Sandwiches Time, Listen Up just to name a few), this album would have been significantly more enjoyable.

 

While some of the solos (Fall Together, Love Explosion) and the drums (December) are great (and while I genuinely dig a handful of tracks including D+D, Slob, Burndt Jamb, Keep Fishin' single version), it's Weezer's most shallow album to date. The lyrics mean absolutely nothing (except maybe for the few boardie-inspired lyrics). Rivers admitted this during that era.  They completely butchered Slave (fantastic melody, terrible final product - see original demo or check out the acoustic cover). Furthermore, the production +mixing is a mess (just listening to the opening of Possibilities makes me cringe).

 

Again, this is simply my opinion. If you like it, then that's cool. Like I mentioned, there is a lot of stuff here and there that I enjoy, but it's the =W= album I skip the most tracks on, and the =W= album I throw into my cd player the least.

popzoom said:

Wow, I don't know what to say. Bashing Maladroit this hard? Whatever man.

hintofcoolness said:


johnny rockets said:

This x100.

 

This is not the same brand of "pop" as Buddy Holly as someone said earlier. 

 

And while I like a few songs from this era (Prettiest Girl, Run Over, Trippin', Don't Wanna Let You Go, I Want You To) the album as a whole is terrible and embarrassing. Let It All Hang Out maybe a fun rocker on the guitar (reminiscent of Green), but the lyrics lack any type of maturity or cleverness. The same goes for I'm Your Daddy, The Girl Got Hot, and Put Me Back Together. And while I'll admit PMBT is a guilty pleasure, in no way do I condone this type of song writing from Weezer (please leave it to The All American Rejects). As for Love Is The Answer, while I can appreciate them going for something "different" this new version was totally unnecessary (except for the bridge which I love in this version) since the original Make Believe version is fine. I still can't believe this, along with In The Mall, made the standard album in place of Prettiest Girl and Run Over. The point is Rivers, and Weezer collectively, have far too much talent and creativity to produce a whole album of shallow Top 40-ready made tracks. Angel, Dreamin, Greatest Man, Pork and Beans, Pig, Spider, Sweeney, and some stuff in Hurley prove this. I'm not trying to bash Weezer or Rivers here but this midlife crisis of an album was a mistake, and comes very close to dethroning Maladroit as this band's worst.


James Stockwell (Jamekae) said:

The first five points that come into my mind on why Raditude sucks:

 

1) The whole album feels like a knee-jerk reaction by Rivers after awareness of growing irrelevancy. Raditude feels like Rivers' answer to try to avoid musical redundancy. ("If I work with songwriters who have written huge hits for Katy Perry, The Veronicas, Britney Spears, Madonna, Bowling for Soup [etc.] I will be as popular as they are!")

2) Most of the lyrics are vapid and show obvious detachment from the author, in some cases Rivers wasn't even the author (J.D. wrote the lyrics for Can't Stop Partying) and do you think Rivers really felt what he sang in Put Me Back Together? He's a forty year old man that should be singing about themes that aren't f*cking taking your girl out to ice-cream (he should be singing stuff like The Angel and the One + Pig), yet you guys still think it's the most sincere stuff out. It 100% sounds like an All American Rejects song, not a Weezer song (I guess it helps that the All American Rejects co-wrote the song!).

3) Bland, uninspired, predictable song directions. There ain't any Paperface/Hot Tub-esque, left field bridges here folks!

4) "Hi, my name is Rivers Cuomo, my favourite band is Weezer and my favourite album is Raditude" + Wuggies + Sydney + the name "Raditude". Don't need to elaborate on this.

5) Horrible mixed + overproduced. Where was the Weezer that fought for good mixing for the Red album?

 

The Prettiest Girl in the Whole Wide World, Run Over By a Truck, I Don't Want to Let You Go and Trippin' Down the Freeway are the sole standouts of the album for me. Incidentally, they are the only tracks not to have co-write credits and all of them were written before The Red Album dropped, proving just how bad 2009 was for Weezer.

This is what inspired me to start the thread :) wanted to see why

Trudy Truelove said:
UGH. I hate all the "pure" Weezer fans who say Raditude is a piece of s*** and a "disgrace" to the band. The songs are so fun! I think they should take the time to appreciate some of the great tracks on it. The Underdogs is such a moving song. I'm sad to see it go over looked so often :P
This

Robert Hill said:

I agree. I was just gonna say something along the same lines. It's weird the way some people get up on their high horse over it, or are apparently 'offended' by the album. Even the most ardent of Raditude haters still accept there's (at least) a few good tracks, so how can it be wholly bad? It's a good record. Get a grip and get over it ffs.

 

All groups' output varies over long periods, no matter who or how good they are, we're talking about a group that had been around well over 15 years at the inception of Raditude as a record! I personally think Hurley is probably so good because the album before it was Raditude.

 

Things change, deal with it.


Trudy Truelove said:

UGH. I hate all the "pure" Weezer fans who say Raditude is a piece of s*** and a "disgrace" to the band. The songs are so fun! I think they should take the time to appreciate some of the great tracks on it. The Underdogs is such a moving song. I'm sad to see it go over looked so often :P
Actually this thread is staying surprisingly calm...I like it!

Michael Rowland (Gohi) said:
Guys, this is a discussion forum. Don't get bent out of shape about other people's honest thoughts or opinions. Also, I hope you don't lump my or johnny rockets' post in with the "haters" just because we don't like the album, because we were both respectful and constructive.
Thank you very much, great response and I completely understand!

johnny rockets said:

Like Gohi said, we're not haters. Personally, I was really looking forward to Raditude when it was announced. I had very high hopes that Rivers could hone his pop-rock writing craft with individuals who have a history of producing Top 40 hits.

 

This isn't about thinking 90's Weezer is the one "true" Weezer. The band (and Rivers) take many shapes and forms. Each album is unique in its style and approach. That is something I've always appreciated about this band.

 

The fact of the matter is Raditude is a complete disappointment on all fronts. I love watching bands evolve and change over time, because I am too. However, when my favorite band is writing songs that show a regression in their abilities, I can't sit still. If Rivers wants to be a hit machine, that's fine as long as the songs are good.

 

But Raditude was a terrible direction. For a man who we all know can develop melodies that rival Paul McCartney and Brian Wilson and write lyrics that are both clever and thoughtful, for a band we know are collectively and individually (see The Space Twins, The Relationship, Special Goodness) musically capable of producing classic tracks, Raditude is beyond underwhelming.

 

I don't want this band to create another Blue or Pinkerton. In fact Make Believe, Red, and Hurley (despite the missteps because they are there) all show that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Rivers doesn't have to be depressed to write good songs. The last thing I want is for the man to be a reclusive hermit again. I want him to actually write about his daughter without mutating it into a song about picking up younger chicks or socks. I want him to write genuine songs showing his affection for his wife for once.

 

Of course he doesn't have to be limited to just those topics. But when Rivers writes from the point of view of a 14 year old (even if I do kinda enjoy that stupid daydreaming about ice cream song) or leopard handbags or chicklets, I've gotta draw a line somewhere.  Rivers always had a way of being immature in his lyrics, but at least they were witty back then.

 

There's also the issue with the lack of solos and variety in song arrangements. Something like Blowin' My Stack isn't the most poetic thing, but it's fun and interesting as hell. That breakdown and that scream is something that has been missing in Weezer for a long time.

 

But hey does any of this ruined the experience of being a Weezer fan? No. I'm still here, on 2 different Weezer message boards no less. I've been a fan for 13 years and I don't plan on stopping. This isn't about being one type of fan or another. This is about critiquing Weezer's output and pointing on what I enjoy and find brilliant, and what i find terribly embarrassing and facepalm worthy.

 

All I want from this band is to produce an album with great songs from tracks 1 through 10 again and for them, as well as the fans, to be happy with the final product.


Michael Rowland (Gohi) said:

Guys, this is a discussion forum. Don't get bent out of shape about other people's honest thoughts or opinions. Also, I hope you don't lump my or johnny rockets' post in with the "haters" just because we don't like the album, because we were both respectful and constructive.
popzoom, you just said what i've been thinking for the past year. thank you.

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