I'm not going to draw a hard and fast line between "old" and "new" Weezer. I think in my mind, probably Red and everything after is "New," but I think some die hards would start at Green. 

Anyway, I've been doing some thinking, and I've decided I've been pretty hard on Rivers and Weezer. Pinkerton means a lot to me, and I'll admit to judging other Weezer albums against it. That's not fair, though; other albums weren't meant to be what Pinkerton was. 


So, I've been trying to keep an open mind. I have a few break out favorites (remember, no hard and fast "New Weezer"): 



Unspoken--This song redeems Hurley for me. He did this one acoustic on youtube and the Guitar Center Sessions, but I like the album version, with the build up and eventual entry of the full band, and the repeating of the chorus over and over. The lyrics aren't as complex as Pinkerton, but Rivers does well with simple lyrics and repetition in this instance. 

If I had one critique, it would be that I'd have like to have heard electric guitars for the fills instead of woodwinds and what I think are violins. That's more of a personal preference, though. When I fell in love with Weezer at 16, before I even really paid attention to lyrics, it was the guitars that hooked me, and Rivers is So Good at what he does with an electric guitar. Is it true that this was about his wife? I can't remember where I heard that. I know I've felt like this in long term relationships before, and was glad to find this song. 

Where's My Sex? I think this song is clever, and a lot of fun. I like when the guitars sound like the washing machine running. I'm not so crazy about the bridge, but this is a great pop song--suggestive, singable, and simple, but not brainless. A guilty pleasure.

Perfect Situation--semi-new Weezer. I included it because it's one of my favorite Weezer songs, and Make Believe gets a bad rap sometimes. Like I said, I like guitar solos, and these two are fantastic, and moving. Another example of Rivers' simple lyrics at their best. He manages to avoid "cheesy" and is still pretty confessional and revealing, which is what I love about him. The music video is priceless, too. 




There are a lot of others, but this is getting too long. His newer songs aren't all perfect, but a lot of them have pretty good potential. I wonder if the pace at which he was releasing the albums has anything to do with the unfinished/unpolished feel of some of the songs. 

Views: 1765

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I *think* , and please, all of you correct me if I'm wrong, but Rivers said in an interview that Perfect Situation was - he hoped - his last song about being embarrassed over being shy.  Or something to that effect.  And, for me, that marked a change in Weezer.  In the music and the content. 

No point, just making a random statement i guess.

 

I agree with a lot of your points.. I believe it was Ric Ocasek who said something along the lines of Rivers being a far superior lead guitararist than he displays on his albums.. It was also mentioned a few times, his (pre =w= gtar schooling and self-skills-honing).. In 'Rivers's Edge'..
I'd love Weezer to release something along the lines of 1978's Van Halen. Pop-Rock with metal hard n'fast lead guitar breaks.. It'd probably be a lot like Red + hypnotic/almost psychedelic =VH= esque solo's ...

According to everyone who would know, he's knowing and willingly been holding back gee-tar wise.

Well, that song is solid gold. I wonder what made him want to change. 


Avery Doll said:

I *think* , and please, all of you correct me if I'm wrong, but Rivers said in an interview that Perfect Situation was - he hoped - his last song about being embarrassed over being shy.  Or something to that effect.  And, for me, that marked a change in Weezer.  In the music and the content. 

No point, just making a random statement i guess.

 

That's so sad. I mentioned it before, but Rivers' guitar solos were what got me into Weezer. I was young and stupid and didn't understand what good music was, and then I heard Falling For You and never looked back. I can't explain to you how those songs made me feel, what a thrill it was to discover them. 

I wonder if his reasoning has something to do with the unique relationship he has with his critics and fans. In his Guitar Center Sessions interview, he talked about moving away from the Avant Guarde "shredding solos" kind of stuff to write crowd pleaser songs... which was great, because it brought us Blue. You might even say that it brought him into a different, more mature level of awareness of the music that he was creating, to consider an audience and refine his output to by excluding indulgent "guitar wanking." (Not that guitar wanking is always a bad thing.) 

However, I wonder sometimes how fans' and critics' reactions to Pinkerton might have changed him--that was a beautiful album, and obviously the object of immeasurable care and attention. To experience such widespread rejection must have made him more cautious, even overly so. The music changed for good. He still writes beautiful songs, but they're gems among dozens of songs that just aren't memorable. 

I still can't puzzle out his relationship with his fans. He's become more accessible in superficial ways--twitter, facebook, ustream--but from what I hear, he used to be active and engaging, and actually to enter into discussion with his fans on message boards. I can't say that I blame him for discontinuing this behavior; fans are different these days. It used to take effort and intention to keep up with your favorite artist. Now, any idiot with an internet connection can come on here and clog up the message board with nonsense. 

I've heard it said that Pinkerton was "before its time." Well, what better time than now to create something like that again? Forget being a flash in the pan pop song writer; Rivers is an artist, and his output should reflect that. I wish that he'd play that guitar like he used to. I'd love to see SFTBH fleshed out. I'd also like to hear them experimenting with something darker and stop worrying about pleasing tweens. I think he was trying something out like that on Everyone, and a few songs on Maladroit had a darker sound. 


aO - r3tH>VHs H6i3l u3b - Bs said:

I agree with a lot of your points.. I believe it was Ric Ocasek who said something along the lines of Rivers being a far superior lead guitararist than he displays on his albums.. It was also mentioned a few times, his (pre =w= gtar schooling and self-skills-honing).. In 'Rivers's Edge'..
I'd love Weezer to release something along the lines of 1978's Van Halen. Pop-Rock with metal hard n'fast lead guitar breaks.. It'd probably be a lot like Red + hypnotic/almost psychedelic =VH= esque solo's ...

According to everyone who would know, he's knowing and willingly been holding back gee-tar wise.

I agree with you until your last few lines. "Everyone" and Maladroit are examples of songs that have absolutely no substance and are quite weak. 

You think so? I think Maladroit has some solid, feel good singles on it, although, I'll admit I never listened to it much until the last year or two. Space Rock will get stuck in my head for days sometimes, which is frustrating, because I can't understand what he's saying... 

Rivers has definitely written some stupid songs. Namely Where's My Sex, but stuff like Memories, most of Maladroit, El Scorcho, and some of the red album. But I still love all those songs because Rivers is a genius. As for old and new weezer, I think weezer has stayed pretty much the same, but their music slowly changed. The blue album is nothing like Hurley, but if you listen to all their albums in order, it's gradual. So I wouldn't necessarily divide them up into two factions. It's all one big thing.

Huh, I've never heard anyone say they didn't like El Scorcho before. What don't you like about it?

I agree that there's continuity between the albums, but I think a lot of fans feel that there was some sort of shift after Pinkerton. In the last pages of the Pinkerton Diaries, he writes notes on looking for a new sound, but it seems like something more than that, like maybe his attitude towards everything changed. 

I don't know, this is all just fun speculation. I heard once that if art was very good, it was difficult to separate the art from the artist. Weezer's music is meaningful for a lot of people, so I think it's natural that some sort of fascination with Rivers' and his method will follow. As for me, I'm curious--what makes a self proclaimed "pensive existentialist" become the guy that does State Farm commercials and collaborates with Miranda Cosgrove? How do you reconcile that? 

Anyway, you're right about him being a genius, I think. ; ) Thanks for indulging my discussion. I'm glad you posted again, because I've been meaning to come back and add:


Miss Sweeney--I bought the regular old version of Red since it was all they had at the store, and almost missed out on this gem. The dialogue in the beginning sort of reminds me of David Bowie's Space Oddity. I like the line "navy business suit clinging tightly to your spine," because I immediately get a very strong mental picture. Beside that, it's a beautiful, confessional song, the kind that Rivers does well. 

Miss Sweeney is for sure one of the best; if they are serious about bringing the Red album back live in concert, I hope it will be included

WeezerWoman said:

Huh, I've never heard anyone say they didn't like El Scorcho before. What don't you like about it?

I agree that there's continuity between the albums, but I think a lot of fans feel that there was some sort of shift after Pinkerton. In the last pages of the Pinkerton Diaries, he writes notes on looking for a new sound, but it seems like something more than that, like maybe his attitude towards everything changed. 

I don't know, this is all just fun speculation. I heard once that if art was very good, it was difficult to separate the art from the artist. Weezer's music is meaningful for a lot of people, so I think it's natural that some sort of fascination with Rivers' and his method will follow. As for me, I'm curious--what makes a self proclaimed "pensive existentialist" become the guy that does State Farm commercials and collaborates with Miranda Cosgrove? How do you reconcile that? 

Anyway, you're right about him being a genius, I think. ; ) Thanks for indulging my discussion. I'm glad you posted again, because I've been meaning to come back and add:


Miss Sweeney--I bought the regular old version of Red since it was all they had at the store, and almost missed out on this gem. The dialogue in the beginning sort of reminds me of David Bowie's Space Oddity. I like the line "navy business suit clinging tightly to your spine," because I immediately get a very strong mental picture. Beside that, it's a beautiful, confessional song, the kind that Rivers does well. 

To be honest I haven't listened to these in a while, but I remember when I heard Everyone I thought it was meant to be funny (not really dark) kind of reminded me of something else maybe paperface or another older song that I am forgetting .... except that Everyone sounds like it is making fun of this attitude showing how silly it is. Though I might be totally off here as I am not as well versed in these things...

Also regarding best new music.... I can't wait for the Red Album tour!!! 

WeezerWoman said:

I'd also like to hear them experimenting with something darker and stop worrying about pleasing tweens. I think he was trying something out like that on Everyone, and a few songs on Maladroit had a darker sound. 

Eh, I suppose "dark" is more in comparison to "Hang On," "If You're Wondering," etc. It had a solo in it--not one of his best, but still beats no solo at all. I like the "I can't see straight" part. 

They were doing Red the first time I ever saw them live, so I was a little distracted by wanting to hear as much of Pinkerton live as possible, since those have been my favorite songs since I was a teenager. Sadly, they didn't play a single Pinkerton song at Deluna Fest, the last time I saw them. The crowd was really boring that night, too, but I had a freakin blast. 


natkat said:

To be honest I haven't listened to these in a while, but I remember when I heard Everyone I thought it was meant to be funny (not really dark) kind of reminded me of something else maybe paperface or another older song that I am forgetting .... except that Everyone sounds like it is making fun of this attitude showing how silly it is. Though I might be totally off here as I am not as well versed in these things...

Also regarding best new music.... I can't wait for the Red Album tour!!! 

WeezerWoman said:

I'd also like to hear them experimenting with something darker and stop worrying about pleasing tweens. I think he was trying something out like that on Everyone, and a few songs on Maladroit had a darker sound. 

Hmmm....this argument never seems to get old as a lot of good points are brought up.  I don't know how anyone can say that Green wasn't the definitive delineation of old and new Weezer.  Listen, Rivers Cuomo wants to write pop music and collaborate nowadays.  We need to just accept that.  The RC that wrote Say It Ain't So and Pink Triangle is not the same guy today.  Then, he was a guy who was still trying to make his way with relationships and his place in life and music.  Now, he is a 40-something with a wife and kid who is happy.  Muses change.  Blue came out when I was a junior in high school and it changed my musical life.  I knew then what kind of songs I wanted to write.  Pinkerton is a masterpiece. Up until that time, no one since the Pixies wrote an album with that much substance and emotion.  

I'd love to see SFTBH get realized.  I think an album like that could give rock music the shot in the arm it needs. Why should Green Day write all the modern day concept albums?

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Weezer Bootlegs

SOCIAL

  • Weezer Links

Weezer Mailing List

Music

Loading…

© 2014   Created by Weezer.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

Offline

Live Video